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2 Easy Myofascial Release Exercises to Decrease Pain

2 Easy Myofascial Release Exercises to Decrease Pain

Feeling tense or tight these days? Maybe it’s time to look into some self-myofascial release exercises to help you out. When done in conjunction with your chiropractic treatment and therapies, these techniques can be wonderful tools to add to your pain relief arsenal.

What is Self-Myofascial Release?

Self-myofascial release exercises help smooth out the connective tissue that attaches and stabilizes your muscles—also known as fascia. Practitioners use an instrument, like a small exercise ball or tennis ball, to apply pressure to a group of muscles or fascia. These are usually tense due to inactivity, overuse, repetitive motions or injury.

The Trapezius Release

For neck and shoulder tension

This myofascial release exercise is great for folks who find themselves frequently hunched over. Forward head carriage can cause an imbalance in the neck and shoulder muscles, notably the upper trapezius. This can contribute to headaches and tight shoulders.

  1. Start by standing against a wall, feet flat on the floor and spine straight.

  2. Take a small exercise ball or tennis ball and place it against your trapezius muscle. This is located on the spot between your upper shoulder and neck.

  3. Lightly lean against the wall, putting pressure on the muscle.

  4. Find a tight spot and hold pressure on it for 30 seconds to two minutes.

The Trapezius

To add a little extra to your release, move your head from side to side (ear to shoulder). You can also hold your arm out straight in front of you and move it from right to left.

The Piriformis Release

For low-back and sciatic tension

This myofascial release exercise is perfect for those who sit for long periods throughout the day! A sedentary lifestyle can make the piriformis muscle (which runs from the outside of the hip to your sacrum bone) tight. This can can contribute to low-back pain and even sciatic pain.

  1. Take a seat on a chair with a firm surface, like a dining room chair. Make sure your feet are flat on the floor and your spine is straight.
  2. Holding yourself up, place your small exercise ball against the piriformis muscle. This is between the outside hip and tailbone (as though you’re half-sitting against the ball).
  3. Rest against the ball and hold pressure on the muscle for 30 seconds to two minutes.
The Piriformis Release.

To add a little extra to your release, deepen your stretch by crossing one of your legs over the other at the knee.

Always consult with your doctor or chiropractor before beginning any new therapies, especially if you have a serious medical condition, physical limitations or experience chronic pain.