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What You Need to Know About Plantar Fasciitis

What You Need To Know About Plantar Fasciitis

Roughly 10 percent of the US population will experience an instance of heel pain in their lifetime. In fact, around one million physician visits each year are for plantar fasciitis, which is a common source of heel pain. Do you think there’s a chance you could be experiencing plantar fasciitis? Here’s what you need to know.

WHAT IS PLANTAR FASCIITIS?

Plantar fasciitis is a condition that involves inflammation of the thick band of tissue that spans the bottom of the foot. This ligament, called the plantar fascia, connects your heel bone to your toes, and is the largest in the body. Those with this condition commonly experience pain in the sole or near the heel of their foot (from a dull throb to a stabbing pain) that can make it difficult to walk or run.

What Causes It?

Plantar fasciitis can be caused by repetitive strain or injury, most commonly:

  • Running or walking
  • Time spent on your feet
  • Improper footwear
  • A traumatic injury or force (i.e. jumping and landing wrong)

Who Gets It?

Plantar fasciitis is most commonly seen in active adults between the ages of 40 and 70, and is diagnosed more frequently in women than men. Those particularly susceptible are:

  • Runners and athletes
  • Pregnant people
  • People with flat feet or high arches
  • Folks with an uncommon walk or foot position
  • Those who wear high-heeled shoes
  • Workers who stand for long periods of time

How Can I Feel Better?

Once diagnosed by your doctor, there are many different forms of treatment for plantar fasciitis. Cold therapy (icing), stretching and therapies, and adopting more supportive shoes and inserts are all helpful during the healing process. For long-term results, it’s best to make a trip in to see your chiropractor!

Chiropractors are experts in the musculoskeletal system. A chiropractor will be able to directly adjust the foot, lessening pressure on the joints, and in turn, the plantar fascia ligament, to encourage the healing process.